RTU Research Information System
Latviešu English

Publikācija: Changes of Fatty Acid and Squalene Sorption on Latvian Clays after Removal of Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates

Publication Type Conference paper
Funding for basic activity Unknown
Defending: ,
Publication language English (en)
Title in original language Changes of Fatty Acid and Squalene Sorption on Latvian Clays after Removal of Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates
Field of research 2. Engineering and technology
Sub-field of research 2.4 Chemical engineering
Authors Inga Jurgelāne
Juris Mālers
Vitālijs Lakevičs
Līga Bērziņa-Cimdiņa
Keywords illite, sorption, fatty acids, squalene, dissolution of carbonates, organic acids
Abstract Due to their sorption properties clays are used as facial masks for removal of toxins, excess sebum (secretion of sebaceous glands) and as treatment of skin inflammations. Sebum is a mixture of lipids composed mainly of triglycerides, wax esters, squalene, fatty acids, cholesterol and cholesterol esters. Recent research shows that acne patients have for 59% more sebum with 2.2 times higher level of squalene. Another skin disease is seborrheic dermatitis, caused mainly by increased levels of - oleic acid (a fatty acid). The presence of carbonates causes alkaline conditions, which can be irritating to the skin. Majority of the clays used in cosmetics are within the pH range of the skin (pH 5-5.5). The aim of this study is to evaluate the possibility of application of Latvian clays in cosmetics as active ingredients. Sorption experiments were performed with squalene and two fatty acids (oleic and stearic) in squalane media.
Reference Dušenkova, I., Mālers, J., Lakevičs, V., Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L. Changes of Fatty Acid and Squalene Sorption on Latvian Clays after Removal of Calcium and Magnesium Carbonates. In: Abstracts of Riga Technical University 54th International Scientific Conference : Section: Material Science and Applied Chemistry, Latvia, Rīga, 14-16 October, 2013. Riga: RTU Press, 2013, pp.40-40. ISBN 978-9934-10-464-0.
Full-text Full-text
ID 17304